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Open Science: catch phrase, or a better way of doing research?

Abstract
Open Science, as defined by UNESCO’s Recommendation approved November 2021, states it as “an inclusive construct that combines various movements and practices aiming to make multilingual scientific knowledge openly available, accessible and reusable for everyone, to increase scientific collaborations and sharing of information for the benefits of science and society”. The key pillars start with “open scientific knowledge” that includes scientific publications, research data, open-source software and source code, and hardware.

As publishers we have an opportunity, perhaps even an invitation, to better collaborate with scientific data repositories, software development platforms, and hardware manufacturers to consider what the workflows of open science could and should enable for researchers and ways we can help support these efforts.

In this session we will explore the anticipated benefits that Open Science will have on complex cross-domain challenges, bringing more inclusion and equity for researchers in low- and middle-income countries, and encourage more co-design and co-development of research efforts with those impacted by the research outcomes.

NISO Discourse Discussion for this session
https://discourse.niso.org/t/open-science-catch-phrase-or-a-better-way-of-doing-research/602
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Open Science, as defined by UNESCO’s Recommendation approved November 2021, states it as “an inclusive construct that combines various movements and practices aiming to make multilingual scientific knowledge openly available, accessible and reusable for everyone, to increase scientific collaborations and sharing of information for the benefits of science and society”. The key pillars start with “open scientific knowledge” that includes scientific publications, research data, open-source software and source code, and hardware.
As publishers we have an opportunity, perhaps even an invitation, to better collaborate with scientific data repositories, software development platforms, and hardware manufacturers to consider what the workflows of open science could and should enable for researchers and ways we can help support these efforts.
In this session we will explore the anticipated benefits that Open Science will have on complex cross-domain challenges, bringing more inclusion and equity for researchers in low- and middle-income countries, and encourage more co-design and co-development of research efforts with those impacted by the research outcomes.
The NISO Plus conference brings people together from across the global information community to share updates and participate in conversations about our shared challenges and opportunities. The focus is on identifying concrete next steps to improve information flow and interoperability, and help solve existing and potential future problems. Please join us to help address the key issues facing our community of librarians, publishers, researchers, and more — today and tomorrow!
Dr. Rebecca Grant is Head of Data & Software Publishing at F1000, where she supports the development of guidance, policy and publishing methods to encourage researchers to share open and FAIR research data. She has a background in data management for the humanities and social sciences and was previously based at the Digital Repository of Ireland and the National Library of Ireland. She is a qualified Open Data trainer certified by the Open Data Institute. Her doctoral thesis explored the connections between archival theory and research data management practice, using Ireland as a case study.
Jennifer Gibson is Executive Director of Dryad, the open data publishing platform and community committed to the reuse of all research data. Since 2005, she has worked with scientists, funders, publishers, libraries, developers and others to explore fresh paths toward accelerating discovery through open research communication and open-technology innovation. Prior to Dryad, Jennifer was Head of Open Research Communication and founding Head of Marketing and Communications for eLife, a non-profit and research funder-backed initiative to transform science publishing. She is currently Chair of the Board of Directors for OASPA.
Oya Y. Rieger is a senior strategist on Ithaka S+R’s Libraries, Scholarly Communication, and Museums team. She spearheads projects that reexamine the curation and preservation missions of cultural heritage organizations and explore sustainability models for open scholarship. Prior to joining Ithaka S+R, Rieger served as Associate University Librarian at Cornell University Library overseeing digital scholarship, preservation, collection development and scholarly publishing programs. As digital preservation has been a central point of her 25-year career, she has contributed to a range of international initiatives to design, develop, and assess digital preservation initiatives and training programs. With a B.A in Economics (Middle East Technical University, Turkey), she holds an M.S. in Public Administration (University of Oklahoma, US), an M.S. in Information Systems (Columbia University, US), and a Ph.D. in Human-Computer Interaction (Cornell University, US).
Shelley Stall is the Senior Director for the American Geophysical Union’s Data Leadership Program. She works with AGU’s members, their organizations, and the broader research community to improve data and digital object practices with the ultimate goal of elevating how research data and software are managed and valued. Better data management results in better science.
​​Dr. Yongjuan Zhang is an associate research librarian of Shanghai Information Center for Life Science, CAS, where she supports the development of linked data, smart data, knowledge graph and providing knowledge services to scientists. She has a background in data management for the life and medicine sciences. Her doctoral thesis explored the model of Open Dynamic Semantic Publishing (ODSP) based on smart data.