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Centralized vs decentralized information systems-NISO Plus

Abstract
Modern information systems tend to be very centralized, with consolidating forces over the last 30 years defeating the original decentralized architecture of the early Internet and World Wide Web. This session will focus on various projects over the last few years that are focusing on re-decentralizing information flows, from webscale architectures to scholarly publication.
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Modern information systems tend to be very centralized, with consolidating forces over the last 30 years defeating the original decentralized architecture of the early Internet and World Wide Web. This session will focus on various projects over the last few years that are focusing on re-decentralizing information flows, from webscale architectures to scholarly publication.
The NISO Plus conference brings people together from across the global information community to share updates and participate in conversations about our shared challenges and opportunities. The focus is on identifying concrete next steps to improve information flow and interoperability, and help solve existing and potential future problems. Please join us to help address the key issues facing our community of librarians, publishers, researchers, and more — today and tomorrow!

With more than 25 years of experience in product and platform development in scholarly communications, Chris helps industry groups formulate product and technology strategy in a time of rapidly changing business models, new technology, and increasing expectations from users and customers. Chris has played a significant role in many collaborative infrastructure projects and is a strong believer in the power of community-wide collaboration to solve tough problems and drive progress. He was a co-author of the original paper which led to the use of DOIs for reference linking, going on to spend 20 years working with Crossref, including 10 years as a board member. He was a founder member of the ORCID board, helping that organization grow from start-up to become a sustainable part of the scholarly infrastructure landscape before later joining as their second ever Executive Director. He was part of the committee which oversaw the NISO/NFAIS integration, and he continues to serve on the NISO Board. Chris holds a Masters in Electronic Systems Engineering from the University of York in the UK.

Maria Stanton is the Director of Production for Atla, and a member of Atla’s executive leadership team. Atla is a non-profit membership association of librarians and information professionals and a producer of research tools committed to advancing the scholarly study of religion and theology. Maria has strategic responsibility for Atla’s family of products and new product initiatives. Maria represents Atla at various international meetings and conferences, engaging with librarians and publishers. Maria developed a collaborative relationship with ANZTLA, the Australian and New Zealand Theological Library Association, through this work. Before joining Atla, Maria served in various leadership roles with organizations supporting the work of the academic library and publishing communities, including Vice President of Production at Alexander Street Press and Senior Director of Content Operations at Serials Solutions. Maria serves as Vice Chair of the NISO Board for 2021-2022. Maria also serves on SSP’s Early Career Subcommittee and NASIG’s Conference Program Planning Committee. Pronouns – she/her/hers

Wendy Hanamura is the Director of Partnerships at the Internet Archive, one of the world’s largest digital libraries. She helps to steward the DWeb community (GetDWeb.net) that now encompasses ten global nodes of technologists, policymakers, artists and activists all working to build a better web. Hanamura produced the Decentralized Web Summits in 2016 & 2018, and DWeb Camp in 2019. At the Internet Archive, her areas of responsibility include communication and content strategy, strategic planning, and partnership building, all in service of the Internet Archive’s mission: universal access to knowledge. Hanamura was also an Emmy Award-winning television producer & correspondent (CBS, NHK, PBS, KCET/Link) and serves on the boards or advisory panels of the Filecoin Foundation, Filecoin Foundation for the Decentralized Web, Earth Species Project, Harvard Asian American Alumni Alliance, Whose Knowledge? and the Ruddie Memorial Youth Foundation.

Ámbar Tenorio-Fornés (they/she/he) is a free software developer and researcher, with a 5 years degree and a Master in Research in Computer Science. They are the founder and director of Decentralized Academy Ltd, and they lead the development of the blockchain-based software Decentralized Science (funded by LEDGER European Project) and Quartz Open Access (funded by Grant for The Web program). They have submitted their PhD at the Universidad Complutense de Madrid, for which they received funding by an institutional scholarship. Their research aims to provide decentralized governance tools for Commons-Based Peer Production communities. Their previous research and development experience includes participation in the European Projects P2P Models and P2Pvalue. They have been visiting researcher at the University of Surrey, the University of Westminster and Kozminski University. Their experience developing decentralized web tools includes Teem , SwellRT, Decentralized.science, and Quartz Open Access using technologies such as Blockchain and IPFS.