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Indigenous knowledge, standards, and knowledge management-NISO Plus

Abstract
After many years of being overlooked and marginalized, there is now growing awareness of the importance of Indigenous knowledge, and the need for information systems and standards that support it. Developing these in ways that are respectful of the context - cultural, historical, and more - as well as the ownership of this information, is vital. With numerous conversations about these issues taking place around the world, it's time to move from words to action. The participants in this session, who represent a variety of perspectives, will share their thoughts on where we should be focusing our efforts through a mix of presentations, roundtable discussion, and audience participation.
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After many years of being overlooked and marginalized, there is now growing awareness of the importance of Indigenous knowledge, and the need for information systems and standards that support it. Developing these in ways that are respectful of the context - cultural, historical, and more - as well as the ownership of this information, is vital. With numerous conversations about these issues taking place around the world, it's time to move from words to action. The participants in this session, who represent a variety of perspectives, will share their thoughts on where we should be focusing our efforts through a mix of presentations, roundtable discussion, and audience participation.
The NISO Plus conference brings people together from across the global information community to share updates and participate in conversations about our shared challenges and opportunities. The focus is on identifying concrete next steps to improve information flow and interoperability, and help solve existing and potential future problems. Please join us to help address the key issues facing our community of librarians, publishers, researchers, and more — today and tomorrow!
Camille Callison, Tahltan Nation member, is the University Librarian at the University of the Fraser Valley (UFV) and a passionate cultural activist pursuing a PhD in Anthropology at the University of Manitoba. Her research critically examines the relationship between cultural memory institutions and the continued survival and activation of Indigenous knowledges, languages, and cultures. Current professional contributions, Camille serves as the Chair of the National Indigenous Knowledge and Language Alliance (NIKLA) and IFLA Professional Division H as well she serves on the Board of Directors of the Canadian Research Knowledge Network (CRKN), and as a member of IEEE P2890™ Recommended Practice for Provenance of Indigenous Peoples’ Data, OCLC Reimagine Descriptive Workflows Advisory Group, NISO Diversity, Equity, & Inclusion subcommittee and the Canadian Truth and Reconciliation Commission Taskforce on Archives. She is committed to being part of creating meaningful change related to equity, diversity, and inclusivity in the library, archival and cultural memory professions.
Darcy Cullen is Assistant Director, Acquisitions, at the University of British Columbia Press, and the founder of RavenSpace. She has been publishing in Indigenous studies for nearly two decades and been at the forefront of scholarly publishing’s advances in the support of community-based voices, collaborative practices, and technologies that make a positive difference. She is a frequent presenter on these topics and her publications include articles and the edited volume Editors, Scholars, and the Social Text (University of Toronto Press, 2012).

Jane Anderson is an Associate Professor at New York University in Lenapehoking (New York) and Global Fellow in the Engelberg Center for Innovation Law and Policy in the Law School at NYU. Jane has a Ph.D. in Law and works on intellectual and cultural property law, Indigenous rights and the protection of Indigenous/traditional knowledge and cultural heritage. For the last 20 years Jane has been working for and with Indigenous communities to find, access, control, and regain authority and ownership of Indigenous cultural and intellectual property collections and data within universities, libraries, museums and archives. Jane is co-founder of Local Contexts which delivers the Traditional Knowledge and Biocultural Labels and Notices. She is also the co-founder of ENRICH.

Joy Owango is an experienced award-winning Founding Director with a demonstrated history of working in capacity support for early career researchers. She is skilled in Management, Business Strategy and Research Metrics. She is experienced in matters relating to Research Capacity, Higher Education, Research Analytics, Donor, and Government Relations.

Her strengths come in creating and building collaborations using the triple helix in industry, academia, and government. She has created such collaborations with the setup of the Training Centre in Communication (private/ Non-Governmental Organization), with the University of Nairobi (the leading university in East Africa). The objective of the collaboration was to create a support system to help researchers disseminate their research. The programme is celebrating its 14th year anniversary. She sits on the board of AfricArxiv - The free preprint service for African scientists.

Joy is a firm believer in open science being a conduit to democratizing higher education and fulfilling SDG 4.

Maui Hudson is from Whakatōhea, Ngā Ruahine and Te Māhurehure. He is an Associate Professor, Te Kotahi Research Institute at the University of Waikato, focusing on the application of mātauranga Māori to decision-making across a range of contemporary contexts. Maui also advocates for Māori rights and interests through Te Mana Raraunga: Māori Data Sovereignty Network and the Global Indigenous Data Alliance. He is a co-Director of ENRICH, a joint initiative between the University of Waikato and New York University, Local Contexts, and a co-developer of the Biocultural Labels.

Melissa Stoner (Diné) is the Native American Studies Librarian at the University of California, Berkeley. Previously, she worked in the University of Nevada, Las Vegas Library Digital Collections Department as Project Manager for the National Endowment for the Humanities funded National Digital Newspaper Program for the state of Nevada. Melissa also worked as Digital Projects Librarian for Nevada State College on a Institute of Museum and Library Services grant to digitize oral histories. Melissa graduated from San Jose State University with a Masters of Library and Information Science, with a focus on emerging technologies which led to her main focus, the digitization practices of historical and ethnographic materials that contain culturally sensitive information and/or restricted tribal knowledge.
Stacy Allison-Cassin is an Assistant Professor, Teaching Stream, in the LIS program. Her work is centered in the areas of knowledge organization, metadata, and knowledge equity. A Citizen of the Métis Nation of Ontario, she engages in work and research related to Indigenous matters in libraries and the larger cultural heritage sector. With a deep interest in increasing access and visibility for non-textual materials and marginalized knowledge, Stacy is a passionate advocate for change in information structures and metadata systems within the library profession and across the wider GLAM sector.