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Wikidata and Knowledge Graphs in Practice: Using semantic SEO to create discoverable, accessible, machine-readable definitions of the people, places, and services in global information community institutions and organizations

Abstract
As a part of the global information community, libraries provide content and education that expands the access and visibility of data and research in support of an informed public. And yet, search engines and indexing software agents have limited knowledge of the dynamic nature of libraries - the people who make the library happen, the services provided, and the resources procured, thus the very definition of libraries is static, out-dated, and misleading. At its core, this is a metadata problem; our solution is to introduce a web-scale cataloging model that redefines libraries for machine learning environments and search engines. Research by the MSU Library and LSE Library have recognized and approached this metadata problem in two unique ways: implementing local structured data in a knowledge graph model and “inside-out” definitions in Semantic Web endpoints like Wikidata. MSU Library has found that implementing a “Knowledge Graph” linked data model within HTML markup leads to improved discovery and interpretation by the bots and search engines that index and describe what libraries are, what they do, and their scholarly content. In contrast, LSE Library has found that contributing to a collaborative and global metadata source, like Wikidata, is a means to extend reach and engagement with libraries and how they are understood. In this session, we’ll demonstrate how Wikidata can be used as a tool to push out data beyond organizational silos, the technical details of knowledge graph markup and semantic Search Engine Optimization (SEO), work through questions about how metadata can represent an institution/organization equitably, and explain how this work improves the accessibility and reach of global information communities
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As a part of the global information community, libraries provide content and education that expands the access and visibility of data and research in support of an informed public. And yet, search engines and indexing software agents have limited knowledge of the dynamic nature of libraries - the people who make the library happen, the services provided, and the resources procured, thus the very definition of libraries is static, outdated, and misleading...
The NISO Plus conference brings people together from across the global information community to share updates and participate in conversations about our shared challenges and opportunities. The focus is on identifying concrete next steps to improve information flow and interoperability, and help solve existing and potential future problems. Please join us to help address the key issues facing our community of librarians, publishers, researchers, and more — today and tomorrow!
Doralyn Rossmann is a Professor at Montana State University where she researches and teaches about social media practices and optimization, scholarly communication, search engine optimization, communication, and public budgeting

https://doralyn.org

Helen Williams is the Metadata Manager at LSE Library where her team have responsibility for print, electronic and institutional repository metadata, with a strategic focus on exploring and developing new ways in which metadata can support research, learning and teaching.  Helen has previously worked for the Institute of Directors and The London Library, and was on CILIP’s Cataloguing and Indexing Group (now Metadata and Discovery Group) committee from 2009-2016.  https://orcid.org/0000-0003-1259-7097
Jason A. Clark is a librarian @msulibrary, professor, hacker/developer, metadata geek, author - working under the Big Sky and focused on Semantic Web development, digital library development, metadata and data modeling, web services and APIs, search engine optimization, and interface design. http://jasonclark.info
Natasha Simons is Associate Director, Data & Services, for the Australian Research Data Commons (ARDC). She collaborates nationally and internationally to solve key challenges that improve research data infrastructure, policies, skills and practices. Based at the University of Queensland in Brisbane, Natasha leads a geographically dispersed team who are passionate about enabling FAIR data (Findable, Accessible, Interoperable, Reusable) and driving a corresponding change in scholarly communication culture.
Neil Stewart’s team work with digital collections to make them openly available on the web, and to experiment with providing them in new formats. Neil is interested in collection digitisation, digital libraries and web technologies for libraries. Neil has previously held posts at City, University of London and BPP University.