Skip to main content
Video
Create Clip
Add To List
Share

The importance of investment in open research infrastructure-NISO Plus

Abstract
Open research infrastructures are playing an increasingly critical role at all stages of the research life cycle, from grant application through dissemination and evaluation. However, funding for these infrastructures is, at best, patchy. Most infrastructure organizations rely on community support, such as membership, and/or, in some cases, grants. Ensuring that these organizations are fully sustainable will take long-term, reliable investment. In this session we'll look at some of the ways this sort of investment is - or could be - happening, and who is - or should be - involved.

NISO Discourse Discussion for this session
https://discourse.niso.org/t/the-importance-of-investment-in-open-research-infrastructure/569
Filter
Open research infrastructures are playing an increasingly critical role at all stages of the research life cycle, from grant application through dissemination and evaluation. However, funding for these infrastructures is, at best, patchy. Most infrastructure organizations rely on community support, such as membership, and/or, in some cases, grants. Ensuring that these organizations are fully sustainable will take long-term, reliable investment. In this session we'll look at some of the ways this sort of investment is - or could be - happening, and who is - or should be - involved.
The NISO Plus conference brings people together from across the global information community to share updates and participate in conversations about our shared challenges and opportunities. The focus is on identifying concrete next steps to improve information flow and interoperability, and help solve existing and potential future problems. Please join us to help address the key issues facing our community of librarians, publishers, researchers, and more — today and tomorrow!
Ana Heredia is a former researcher turned into STEM editorial and publishing, and more recently into open science infrastructure. After more than 15 years in research, she stepped into the research information ecosystem, working for 8 years at Elsevier, and 4 years at ORCID, leading the strategies of these organizations in the Latin American region. She is now an independent scholarly communications consultant.
Carly Robinson is the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) Assistant Director for the Office of Information Products and Services (IPS). IPS leads the OSTI persistent identifier services and manages development of OSTI search tools providing access to DOE-funded R&D results. IPS responsibilities also include metadata quality and curation, communications, management of interagency and international products, and policy development and implementation. She has a Ph.D. and M.S. in Atmospheric Chemistry from the University of Colorado, and a B.S. in Applied Physics from Michigan Technological University.
Kaitlin Thaney is the Executive Director of Invest in Open Infrastructure, a non-profit initiative designed to enable durable, scalable, and long lasting open scientific and scholarly infrastructure to emerge, thrive, and deliver its benefits on a global scale.

She previously served as the Endowment Director for the Wikimedia Foundation, where she led development of a fund to sustain the future of Wikipedia and free knowledge. Prior to joining Wikimedia, Thaney directed the program portfolio for the Mozilla Foundation, following her time building the Mozilla Science Lab, a program to serve the open research community. She was on the founding team for Digital Science, where she helped launch and advise programs to serve researchers worldwide, building on her time at Creative Commons, where she crafted legal, technical, and social infrastructure for sharing data on the web.

Shelley Stall is the Senior Director for the American Geophysical Union’s Data Leadership Program. She works with AGU’s members, their organizations, and the broader research community to improve data and digital object practices with the ultimate goal of elevating how research data and software are managed and valued. Better data management results in better science.