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Curating a community registry of research organizations-NISO Plus

Abstract
The Research Organization Registry (ROR) (https://ror.org) is an open registry of research organization identifiers that can be used to enrich metadata for scholarly outputs and enable more efficient tracking of research by institutions. ROR IDs are being integrated into many types of platforms and systems wherever affiliation details are collected and presented. In order for the registry to be a trusted data source, we need to keep records up to date as organizations change over time or when new organizations need to be added. ROR is piloting a unique community-based approach to curating registry metadata as part of a funded project through the Institute for Museum and Library Services (IMLS). This approach involves leveraging community curators from around the world, building open infrastructure to support updates to the registry, and developing open, transparent, globally inclusive policies and workflows for handling registry updates. In this talk, we will explain how and why we have developed this approach, share the lessons we have learned along the way, and discuss what we will be doing to further develop our infrastructure and workflows to support the usability and accessibility of the registry over the long term.

NISO Discourse Discussion for this session
https://discourse.niso.org/t/curating-a-community-registry-of-research-organizations/592
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The Research Organization Registry (ROR) (https://ror.org) is an open registry of research organization identifiers that can be used to enrich metadata for scholarly outputs and enable more efficient tracking of research by institutions. ROR IDs are being integrated into many types of platforms and systems wherever affiliation details are collected and presented. In order for the registry to be a trusted data source, we need to keep records up to date as organizations change over time or when new organizations need to be added. ROR is piloting a unique community-based approach to curating registry metadata as part of a funded project through the Institute for Museum and Library Services (IMLS). This approach involves leveraging community curators from around the world, building open infrastructure to support updates to the registry, and developing open, transparent, globally inclusive policies and workflows for handling registry updates. In this talk, we will explain how and why we have developed this approach, share the lessons we have learned along the way, and discuss what we will be doing to further develop our infrastructure and workflows to support the usability and accessibility of the registry over the long term.
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Arthur Smith is lead data analyst for the American Physical Society, primarily working with the Physical Review journals. He has long been an advocate for persistent identifiers and standardization in scholarly publishing.
Carly Robinson is the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) Assistant Director for the Office of Information Products and Services (IPS). IPS leads the OSTI persistent identifier services and manages development of OSTI search tools providing access to DOE-funded R&D results. IPS responsibilities also include metadata quality and curation, communications, management of interagency and international products, and policy development and implementation. She has a Ph.D. and M.S. in Atmospheric Chemistry from the University of Colorado, and a B.S. in Applied Physics from Michigan Technological University.

With more than 25 years of experience in product and platform development in scholarly communications, Chris helps industry groups formulate product and technology strategy in a time of rapidly changing business models, new technology, and increasing expectations from users and customers. Chris has played a significant role in many collaborative infrastructure projects and is a strong believer in the power of community-wide collaboration to solve tough problems and drive progress. He was a co-author of the original paper which led to the use of DOIs for reference linking, going on to spend 20 years working with Crossref, including 10 years as a board member. He was a founder member of the ORCID board, helping that organization grow from start-up to become a sustainable part of the scholarly infrastructure landscape before later joining as their second ever Executive Director. He was part of the committee which oversaw the NISO/NFAIS integration, and he continues to serve on the NISO Board. Chris holds a Masters in Electronic Systems Engineering from the University of York in the UK.

Maria Gould is a product manager and research data specialist at California Digital Library at the University of California, where she leads the ROR initiative.
Martin Spenger is working with a focus on Research Data Management at the University Library at Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München in Germany. He joined the ROR Curation Team in 2021.
Nick Lundvick is a Scholarly Communications and Curation librarian at Argonne National Laboratory, where he is responsible for the review and release of Argonne-authored publications. He has been a member of the ROR Curation Team since early 2021.