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The role of the information community in ensuring that information is authoritative

Abstract
How much of a responsibility does the information community have to ensuring that the content we provide is authoritative? Preprints are a great way to make early research results availabe, but it's not always clear that those results are not yet thoroughly vetted. Peer review - a key element of scholarly publication - can help, but it's far from foolproof. Retractions are another important tool, but most retracted research is still all too readily available. What can and should we be doing to safeguard the integrity of the content being created, disseminated, and used?

NISO Discourse Discussion for this session
https://discourse.niso.org/t/the-role-of-the-information-community-in-ensuring-that-information-is-authoritative/595
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How much of a responsibility does the information community have to ensuring that the content we provide is authoritative? Preprints are a great way to make early research results available, but it's not always clear that those results are not yet thoroughly vetted. Peer review - a key element of scholarly publication - can help, but it's far from foolproof. Retractions are another important tool, but most retracted research is still all too readily available. What can and should we be doing to safeguard the integrity of the content being created, disseminated, and used?
The NISO Plus conference brings people together from across the global information community to share updates and participate in conversations about our shared challenges and opportunities. The focus is on identifying concrete next steps to improve information flow and interoperability, and help solve existing and potential future problems. Please join us to help address the key issues facing our community of librarians, publishers, researchers, and more — today and tomorrow!
Dr. Bahar Mehmani is Reviewer Experience Lead in the Global STM journals team at Elsevier. She leads Elsevier's peer review strategy and oversees projects related to researchers' and academics' pain points throughout the peer-review process. Bahar is a member of the NISO peer review taxonomy working group and the chair of the peer review committee and council member of the European Association of Science Editors (EASE). She received her PhD in Theoretical Physics from the University of Amsterdam (UvA) in 2010. Before joining Elsevier, she was a postdoc researcher at Max Planck Institute for the Science of Light (MPL). Twitter: @ mehmanib
Jodi Schneider is Assistant Professor at the School of Information Sciences, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign where she runs the Information Quality Lab. She studies scholarly communication and the science of science through the lens of arguments, evidence, and persuasion with a special interest in controversies in science. Her recent work has focused on topics such as systematic review automation, semantic publication, and the citation of retracted papers. She has held research positions across the U.S. as well as in Ireland, England, France, and Chile. Her work has been funded by IMLS, NIH, Science Foundation Ireland, the European Commission, and an NSF CAREER award. She leads the Alfred P. Sloan-funded project, Reducing the Inadvertent Spread of Retracted Science: Shaping a Research and Implementation Agenda.
Nici has been with Center for Open Science since 2015, leading the infrastructure vision and strategy to enable open science. Her focus is on open-source technology to support open practices in research workflows as part of a broader culture shift movement calling for openness, transparency, and reproducibility of research. As part of COS’s theory of change, OSF and it’s suite of product solutions to make open scholarship behaviors possible and to meet researchers where they are by lowering the barrier to entry for adoption of open practices are reinforced by complementary and interdependent policy and research activities. Reinforced through engagement with communities and stakeholders to change norms, incentives, and policies toward open scholarship and by investigating the state of the research culture to gather evidence in order to evaluate the effectiveness of technology and policy interventions.

Samantha Blickhan is the Humanities Lead for Zooniverse and Co-Director of the Zooniverse team at Chicago’s Adler Planetarium. Her duties include guiding the strategic vision for Zooniverse Humanities efforts, managing development of new tools and resources, and leading research efforts which have been supported by funding from the IMLS, NEH, NSF, ACLS, and AHRC. She is co-I of the Collective Wisdom project, which produced The Collective Wisdom Handbook, an authoritative book on the ‘state of the art’ in cultural heritage crowdsourcing, in 2021.

(Social: @snblickhan)

Stephanie Dawson, CEO ScienceOpen, grew up in northern California, studied Biology at Yale University and received a PhD in German Literature from the University of Washington. She spent over 10 years at the academic publisher De Gruyter in Berlin in the fields of biology and chemistry in both journals and book publishing. 2013 she joined ScienceOpen as managing director. With ScienceOpen she has been exploring scholarly communication in a digital environment, experimenting with open access publishing, discovery, preprints, open post-publication peer review, community curation, metadata enrichment, and alternative metrics.