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Martha Kyrillidou

CEO, QualityMetrics, LLC
Martha Kyrillidou runs a consulting company, QualityMetrics, LLC, from Silver Spring, MD. She consults in management, evaluation, assessment and R&D activities. She helps libraries respond to customer needs through the development of user-focused services and culture that enhance the user-experience. Martha holds a PhD in library and information science from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, and an MLS and an MEd with specialization in evaluation and measurement from Kent State University.

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The digital information environment means that users engage with content and services in ways that the assessment community is still trying to identify and understand. New and nuanced metrics can help tell a deeper story of impact for libraries. In this session, we will examine the complex issue of data privacy and ethics in the context of library assessment, with case studies drawn from altmetrics, learning analytics, community-based assessment, ebooks, and OER. Questions that will frame our discussion include: What privacy concerns does following user data in that context raise for those responsible for assessment? What are the logistics of gathering that data? What are we collecting, and for what purpose?
Perhaps the most theoretical of all the training sessions, this final segment will be addressing more nebulous questions. What information products and services require new metrics? What data might provide insights? Who controls that data? There is a need for collaboration between various stakeholder communities in developing useful and constructive metrics. How can that be accomplished? What techniques or tools are needed?
This session further delves into the available data derived from library activity; this might encompass everything from data gathered through the library web site to sensor data arising from traffic within the library. How is the library assessing programs offered? What data arises from mobile devices when delivering location based services? How to evaluate student learning outcomes in the context of the library?
Once the individual charged with assessment has inventoried available data and collected any additional data needed, the next step is to select appropriate software for working with that data. This session will outline a range of APIs, plug-ins, and other available software (Excel, Tableau, MINES for Libraries, etc.) that allow professionals to “get their hands dirty” in productively working with the data.
Having collected and studied the needed data, what might be the best means of developing a narrative? Training participants will focus in this session on how to explain the story being told by the data. This segment may involve case studies from different institutions to discuss what works in a particular example or what may be missing. The session may include discussions of data visualization, the role of assessment in strategic planning, as well as how to use the story in activities of advocacy and outreach.
This segment of our assessment training series will engage registrants in thinking creatively about what data might be used and applied to the areas of investigation. Beyond simple counts, what might be interesting statistical techniques in considering the data. How to identify and describe a correlation as apart from causation? What represents a reliable benchmark? What metrics should be a part of determining the benchmark? How best to approach those resistant to such metrics as reliable indicators?
This second session will address the starting point of any assessment activity – an understanding of what data may be available to the investigator, what additional data may be needed and the process of research design. The lecturer will touch on privacy concerns in the gathering of data as well as the challenges of collecting and working with data contained in third-party provider systems.
This opening session will provide the rationale for and benefits of assessment training. Administrators, librarians and others working in the academic environment need to base decisions on user and usage data gathered from a variety of library services and systems. This initial overview lays the ground work for understanding what’s different about library assessment in the 21st century, the variety of means for conducting assessment in the library, the skill sets needed, and the challenges to be faced – whether those be issues of handling sensitive personal data or unanticipated resistance from co-workers.

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