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NISO Webinar

Helping people gain a greater understanding of the information community — our issues and concerns, challenges and opportunities — is core to NISO's mission. Our events are a key element of this, with our popular webinar program at their heart. And, following the NISO/NFAIS merger earlier this year, all NISO members can now attend all 14 webinars in 2020 completely free of charge! This includes an unlimited number of places and full access to a recording of each webinar for anyone who is unable to attend the event itself.

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VIDEO

KBART Open Hour Webinar

01:01:07
Do you work for a publisher, aggregator, or content provider and have questions about how to implement KBART for your content? Need to know how to format a particular KBART field, or what it is used for? Want to learn about resources you can use in developing your KBART files, or how to get feedback on your files? On October 8, 2019, at 11 a.m. Eastern, join the KBART Standing Committee for a FREE, 60-minute "open hour" question-and-answer format webinar hosted by NISO and get information about KBART straight from the group. We will begin the webinar with a brief presentation on the KBART endorsement process, followed by answers to frequently asked questions and discussion of questions posted by attendees. To submit a question ahead of time, please email kbart@niso.org with the subject "Webinar Question". Attendees will also be able to submit questions during the webinar via chat. KBART (Knowledge Bases and Related Tools) is a NISO Recommended Practice that describes how to transmit data about serials and books/monographs to knowledge bases maintained by link resolver, resource management, and discovery system vendors.
Artificial intelligence is frequently used as an umbrella term for a broad range of potential uses of computer algorithms to accomplish a cognitive task in a relatively short time-frame. In the more specific context of the information community, “smart systems” may be expected to do everything from the handling of a routine voice request to phrase extraction from the literature for data discovery and re-use to image assessment. The possibilities are intriguing, but there are hesitations as well. It’s very easy to replicate existing social biases. There are discussions over the ethical uses of artificial intelligence. How might intelligent infrastructure support the work of the information community? Librarians are considering whether a virtual assistant might be able to aid in providing research support. Seen from an adjacent space -- apart from the work of academic researchers -- content and platform providers are considering how the use of algorithms, data and analytics may serve to enhance smart services for users. This 90-minute webinar will offer a glimpse into the practical application of artificial intelligence in support of research workflow and outputs.
Particularly in the humanities where the scholarly monograph is of critical importance, where and how books may be accessed by scholars is a sensitive issue. How should libraries be communicating with their communities about issues of access, convenience and responsiveness when it comes to the printed volumes that may take up so many valuable square feet of the library’s physical plant? Automation and offsite storage represent a wonderful benefit to institutions, but do researchers feel their needs have been slighted? How best to engage with the community on sensitive issues of preservation and best practice?
Particularly in the humanities where the scholarly monograph is of critical importance, where and how books may be accessed by scholars is a sensitive issue. How should libraries be communicating with their communities about issues of access, convenience and responsiveness when it comes to the printed volumes that may take up so many valuable square feet of the library’s physical plant? Automation and offsite storage represent a wonderful benefit to institutions, but do researchers feel their needs have been slighted? How best to engage with the community on sensitive issues of preservation and best practice?
Particularly in the humanities where the scholarly monograph is of critical importance, where and how books may be accessed by scholars is a sensitive issue. How should libraries be communicating with their communities about issues of access, convenience and responsiveness when it comes to the printed volumes that may take up so many valuable square feet of the library’s physical plant? Automation and offsite storage represent a wonderful benefit to institutions, but do researchers feel their needs have been slighted? How best to engage with the community on sensitive issues of preservation and best practice?
We all know that automated personal assistants can find you the closest gas station or sushi spot. But can that same technology be programmed to find the best ten articles for a student’s assignment? The capability is unclear, as is the advisability of the task. But what is clear is that voice-driven technology as well as arbitrary algorithms are changing the ways in which users may be driving or directed in their information tasks. Taxonomies, controlled vocabularies, and similar tools have been used for decades in delivering effective online search. But now, with Alexa and Siri potentially being in the room, shouldn’t libraries and vendors be talking about what’s operating under the hood?
We all know that automated personal assistants can find you the closest gas station or sushi spot. But can that same technology be programmed to find the best ten articles for a student’s assignment? The capability is unclear, as is the advisability of the task. But what is clear is that voice-driven technology as well as arbitrary algorithms are changing the ways in which users may be driving or directed in their information tasks. Taxonomies, controlled vocabularies, and similar tools have been used for decades in delivering effective online search. But now, with Alexa and Siri potentially being in the room, shouldn’t libraries and vendors be talking about what’s operating under the hood?
For purposes of discovery, the metadata supplied to libraries for e-book content must be complete, explicit and accurate. APIs have been constructed. Best practices have been identified. What are the gaps that still affect the user experience in identifying and navigating to needed content? What might be needed to bridge those gaps? Why are we still wrestling with this issue? This two-part webinar will bring together a cross-section of content providers and libraries to discuss the challenges faced.
For purposes of discovery, the metadata supplied to libraries for e-book content must be complete, explicit and accurate. APIs have been constructed. Best practices have been identified. What are the gaps that still affect the user experience in identifying and navigating to needed content? Why might be needed to bridge those gaps? This session will bring together a cross-section of content providers and libraries to discuss the challenges faced.
This event will look at messaging, media platforms, policy-making, agency and tensions involved in librarians-as-advocates, social media and effective practices of navigating participatory networks.
Aside from funding libraries themselves, there are many innovative projects that might never be accomplished without the support of grants from foundations of various sizes and sorts. What are the current trends? The speakers in this event will identify and examine those trends and share what their impact on the academic environment might be.
In an age when rapid reference inquiries may be handled through a mobile phone and a search engine, reference work in the library must change and expand. How is that unfolding? What are the new expectations of the information products once referred to as major reference works – those comprehensive or subject-specific encyclopedias and indexes that served library professional and patron? How are librarians combining free and subscription resources? This webinar will examine a variety of approaches to enhanced service.
Just how good (or how bad) are the Web-based interfaces encountered by library users these days? Having invested in the creation of significant digital collections, how can libraries enhance usage of those collections? How do scholars and students (especially those working remotely) expect to engage with this content online? What should the interfaces be designed to support? Is there a baseline that has been established? What room exists for innovation in the user experience (UX) and user interface (UI)?
Faced with a highly diverse combination of externally and internally collected data (web visits, gate counter, collection usage, subject analysis, budgets, space use, reference help interactions, etc.), academic libraries have rapidly mastered the value and use of analytics. Whether analyzing prospective subscription packages to determine their value for an institution’s research activities or reviewing usage data drawn from the local digital repository, libraries want to extract meaning from the increasing volume of library data. What does that data look like? How should that data be managed? And in what combinations is that data most enlightening?
We have the data and the report. Looking beyond the simple statistical report (how many individuals attended a program or searched a database), what might be best practices in using that data in support of long-term planning and decision making? What types of trends do libraries believe they might be seeing? Wrestling with library data should yield significant insights about the institution's needs. Libraries and those who serve them will benefit from understanding how data is being wrangled, mixed, and interpreted.
As libraries re-evaluate and redesign the services offered to their communities, the ripples of change can be felt across the institution. New job titles and functions appear in university employment postings—clinical information specialist, data scientist, assessment librarian. Space previously given over to stacks is reallocated. Information resources and tools reshape the library’s budget. Whether the process is visible or invisible to the library patron, the functions of the library are being re-engineered at a core level. What are the implications for library directors? And for content and platform providers?
Annotation tools can be of tremendous value to students and to scholars. Such support for collaboration can add tremendous value to the information that’s being accessed by those user populations. What is the current state of the art? This event will bring together input from content and platform providers as well as those who are actively seeking to use those tools, whether in the library or the classroom.
This event will look at bias awareness and the difficulties of appropriately valuing diversity in a work environment. What are the implications for the library in terms of data collection, recruitment practices, and mentoring? How might library leadership encourage applicants from a broad spectrum of cultural backgrounds while avoiding any appearance of double standards? How might technology jobs in the library be made more appealing to a greater range of applicants?
This event will look at bias awareness and the difficulties of appropriately valuing diversity in a work environment. What are the implications for the library in terms of data collection, recruitment practices, and mentoring? How might library leadership encourage applicants from a broad spectrum of cultural backgrounds while avoiding any appearance of double standards? How might technology jobs in the library be made more appealing to a greater range of applicants?
How does one create awareness of the bias that may be introduced into automated systems? This session will look at the selection of vocabulary in establishing taxonomies and ontologies. What is the real nature of the issue? How might establishing, maintenance, and use of a thesaurus contribute to a more inclusive search/discovery process? And where should responsibility lie for developing such ostensibly neutral tools? How can we bring more diverse voices into the development/maintenance of these resources?
How does one create awareness of the bias that may be introduced into automated systems? This session will look at the selection of vocabulary in establishing taxonomies and ontologies. What is the real nature of the issue? How might establishing, maintenance, and use of a thesaurus contribute to a more inclusive search/discovery process? And where should responsibility lie for developing such ostensibly neutral tools? How can we bring more diverse voices into the development/maintenance of these resources?
early twenty years into the 21st century, how exactly do we define the word, library? This is hardly a frivolous question. Neither is it a settled one. If a library is less defined by its information resources or access services than by foot traffic or usage stats, then appropriate assessment of its contribution to the institution -- through either quantitative or qualitative metrics -- becomes demonstrably more difficult. The question has implications for administrators with budgetary concerns as much as for educators in the field. Should libraries be focused on decentralization in order to better serve specialized research communities? Or should they be more centralized as the central organ of an educational organism?
Libraries have individually labored at the creation, conversion and re-use of data housed at their institutions and in their systems. This session will look at next steps for enlarging those efforts by linking data from multiple initiatives in an effort to broaden its value and functionality to the community. Current initiatives include prototyping efforts aimed at creating new suites of tools as well as enabling libraries to draw from newly unified taxonomies and vocabularies. Pick up on the practical tips and strategies needed to build on modules created by other information professionals!
So much of library workflow and usage is shrouded from public view, sometimes due to the interest of protecting patron privacy, sometimes due to the assumption that the patron or the public would have no interest in knowing the process. At the same time, trust is most easily generated in the context of transparency. For example, the public needs to understand and trust the weeding process and/or the rationale behind off-site storage. What does your community understand or need to learn about the ways in which libraries operate in order to trust the library more fully? How can vendors and service providers support more transparency to users? This event will take the form of a round-table discussion.
Have 3D printers become commonplace? Is someone in your library using pizza boxes to create their next-generation VR viewer? Perhaps you’re wondering just how sophisticated (and how spacious) a Maker Space needs to be these days. What are the expectations from students and faculty? What tools and services need to be part of a library’s maker space?
This session will focus on discussions of open source publishing platforms and systems. What is the value proposition? What functionalities are commonplace? Where are the pitfalls in adoption and use by publishers or by libraries? What potential is there for scholarly societies who are similarly responsible for publication support and dissemination? Given the rising interest in open access and open educational resources, this session will offer professionals a sense of what is available, a sense of practical concerns and a general sense of their future direction.
Libraries have long collected audio and video content in varying formats housing those materials in special archives and collections. However, unlike the static documents that have been digitized for purposes of enabling Web access by users, some collections of audio and video content may not have received the appropriate attention and resources that ensure long-term preservation. This session will look at a variety of such collections and associated archiving initiatives focused on what is an increasingly at-risk set of materials.
In an age when rapid reference inquiries may be handled through a mobile phone and a search engine, reference work in the library must change and expand. How is that unfolding? What are the new expectations of the information products once referred to as major reference works – those comprehensive or subject-specific encyclopedias and indexes that served library professional and patron? How are librarians combining free and subscription resources? This webinar will examine a variety of approaches to enhanced service.
This session will examine the role and powers of the modern library consortium. Content and systems providers are aware of the need to successfully address consortia demands, but may not be as aware of the importance of collaboration with such groups. Consortia may be set up to satisfy different needs or achieve specific goals in areas such as licensing of content or technological support. Regional or statewide consortia can offer publishers significant insights into what may be expected in a forthcoming fiscal year or the flaws in a proposed business model. The session is intended to foster engagement as well as understanding between supplier and buyer.
When content and platform providers dream of offering smart services to their clients, what do they envision as their value-added offering? Provisioning text and data mining services? Support for the Internet of Things or for Big Data? This session will bring together publishing technologists to spotlight what they see as emerging trends and the rationale for development. Of course, from the customer’s point of view, the issue is whether such smart services are truly in demand from the user population. This webinar is intended to bring together the various stakeholders to look at emerging technologies serving diverse research communities.
Cataloging of materials is not the workflow that it was fifty years ago. The skill sets and tasks associated with application of metadata in the 21st century demand new techniques and tools. What might this entail? Ought there to be different elements included in the metadata? Should there be more application of automated processes? What opportunities for value-add are there for service and content providers? How might these changes improve the success of the user experience? This session will explore the possibilities of revisiting cataloging activities with an eye to enhanced efficiency and effectiveness. A cross-section of views from multiple stakeholders will form the substance of this event. This event will be a roundtable discussion by stakeholders actively engaging with these questions and concerns.
This session will examine various aspects of access and authentication controls in the context of digital information resources. Is there a scalable approach that can satisfy the needs of both corporate as well as academic environments? If not, how can technology be engineered or leveraged such that the nuanced needs of all may be met? What trade-offs might need to be recognized and negotiated? Are there satisfactory answers to the questions that have arisen with regard to privacy and data exchange? This session will bring together a number of industry experts to discuss the challenges and opportunities.
The SeamlessAccess Entity Categories and Attribute Bundles Working Group brought together 22 individuals from around the world and across different sectors to define and promote the categorization of different levels of attribute release profiles (commonly known as entity categories) associated with federated access to scholarly information resources. The group has proposed three separate categories: Authentication Only, Anonymous Authorization, and Pseudonymous Authorization. The goal is to have these categorizations and profiles adopted and/or endorsed by global research and education federations, library communities, and other stakeholder groups. This webinar will review each of these entity categories with a goal of encouraging informed feedback from the community during the public consultation period.
In the last month, many academic institutions have managed to shift their classroom instruction to an online learning environment. Such rapid adaptation of pedagogy and delivery offers both opportunities for innovation as well as logistical challenges for faculty and their libraries alike. This 60-minute, roundtable event draws together administrators from a range of roles and institution types to discuss some of the lessons learned, how they are managing, what has been involved in moving to online instruction with little advance notice, and to share useful techniques for navigating the inevitable constraints as well as potential strategies for success.