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Mike Taylor

Mike Taylor

Head of Metrics Development, Digital Science
Mike Taylor is Head of Metrics Development at Digital Science. He’s new to the company, having spent many years working in Elsevier's Research & Development group and in the Metrics and Analytics Team. Mike works with many community groups, including FORCE11, RDA and NISO, and is well known in the scholarly metrics community. He’s also notorious amongst the Oxford theatrical scene as an actor, producer and director with ElevenOne Theatre. In his spare time he provides the entertainment for many a hen night with the Murder Mystery company, Smoke and Mirrors. Mike is studying for a PhD in alternative metrics at the University of Wolverhampton.

Matching Videos

2 Matching Videos
The primary selling point of metrics for the academic researcher was the promise that the proof provided by such metrics of the value of one’s work would be the increased and long-term funding needed to do such work. Prestige, tenure, influence, even celebrity -- these have been stepping stones to securing significant (and much-needed) grants to educational institutions of all sizes and types. But have these incentives been subverted over time or in specific ways? Is the drive to publish-or-perish the best mechanism for encouraging substantive study? The integrity of the publishing process and perhaps the integrity of the funding model for higher education itself is at stake. This session will look at some of the troubling questions surrounding the incentives offered to the working scholar, researcher, and scientist. Presenters in this virtual conference will consider the following questions: · How might institutions and research facilities best weld available indicators of use or influence into a meaningful metric? · If individual scholarship is best gauged by the value assigned to it by the larger community, then what collection of metrics should be gathered for purposes of determining appropriate rewards in the context of academia? · How might institutions better address this challenge and reward faculty appropriately?
Current thinking is that scientific research should be readily reproducible, discoverable, and openly accessible. There is also significant drive to develop open educational resources in the interests of easing economic burdens on student populations. The challenge then for libraries, content providers and platform providers is how best to implement strategies, technologies and practices in support of those concerns. But there are questions that must be addressed in discussing open science, open educational resources, open access monographs, etc. What supports are necessary in bringing this open approach into reality? What may be feasible in building an inclusive and collaborative knowledge infrastructure in this environment? What are key elements or best practices? What fiscal models or arrangements might be needed to ensure sustainability? Which sector (academic, government/public, commercial, etc.) is best positioned to muster the necessary resources?

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